What is a Carer?

A carer is someone who takes care of another.

-Our loved ones are important to us, when one falls ill or is in need of care, we’re always there to show our family and friends support. The role of a carer is an extremely selfless one, one that requires a lot of patience and support. In this article, we’re going to talk through the role of a carer and what support is out there for you. 💛

A carer is someone who looks after and cares for a partner, family member or friend who requires it because of their age, illness, disability, mental health challenges or anything that means they cannot cope without support from a carer. A carer can be of any age and from any background, it’s important to note that each carer’s experience is unique to their personal situation.

It’s normal for carers to find it difficult to differentiate their role with the person they care for and the relationship they have. It’s also common for people to not recognise themselves as carers and it takes an average of two years to acknowledge their role. This can be a hindrance due to the fact that there is plenty of help available to carers, receiving this help could prevent you from experiencing carer burnout. Knowing the effects of carer burnout means you can ensure your mental and physical health is at the top of your priorities. 💭

How to know if you’re a carer 🥰

As it’s easy to not even recognise your role as a carer, if you help someone in their day-to-day life and they rely on the support that you give them, you may be a carer. Here are some signs that might help you tell that you are someone’s carer.

  • You help some get to their doctor and take responsibility for their medical needs as they are unable to do so themselves
  • Your job and/or personal life has changed or suffered due to the support you have been providing
  • You help with everyday tasks such as washing, dressing, cooking and cleaning
  • Ensure that they enough to eat and drink
  • Help them see their loved ones and friends, or take them to social activities

Is there support for carers?

Whilst a rewarding role, caring for someone is hard work, it’s easy to feel overwhelmed. Taking on the role may evoke emotions such as guilt, resentment, anxiety and frustration, but it’s important to know that theirs help out there for you. 🤗

Whilst most caring roles are voluntary, meaning unpaid, there is such a thing as a carer’s allowance. This is a type of government benefit that provides carers with £67.25 a week. To be eligible for these payments, you must look after someone for more than 35 hours a week. There are more forms of benefits for carers on the NHS website.

You never have to feel worried about asking for support, one of the first steps you can take is to ask for a carer’s assessment from your local council.

What is a carers assessment?

If care for someone who is in need, you can have an assessment which shows you what may help make your life that little bit easier. According to the NHS, a carer’s assessment includes someone from the council asking how you are coping with caring. The assessment focuses on both your physical and mental health as well as your work, free time and relationships. It usually only takes about an hour and the outcome will hopefully end in a care and support plan if you qualify. ‍

The assessment may recommend things like:

  • Someone taking over caring so that you can have a break
  • Gym membership and exercise classes to relieve stress 🏃
  • Help with taxi fares if you don’t drive
  • Help with gardening and housework
  • Training how to lift safely
  • Putting you in touch with local support groups so you have people to talk to
  • Advice about benefits for carers

Let’s summarise

It’s clear that caring for someone can take it out of you but it can be such a rewarding role. With the proper support and boundaries set in place, you can care for a loved one or close friend and help them get the help they need from a friendly face. And, whilst it may feel difficult to ask for help during challenging times and even up until death, it’s important you find people and organisations that you can lean on. 💛 There are a lot of things to think about during someone’s end of life, including wills ✍️, life insurance ☂️ and what to do with their assets and trusts 💷. If you need more help, feel free to chat or email us alexa@bequest.com.

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FF Bequest Limited, trading as Bequest, is authorised and regulated by the Financial Conduct Authority with firm reference number 923791. You can check our authorisation on the FCA Financial Services Register by visiting the following website: register.fca.org.uk . We are registered in England and Wales, Registered office address: Founders Factory, Northcliffe House, London, United Kingdom, W8 5EH. Company Number 12367897.

Regulated by the Information Commissioner's Office (ICO) [ZA662891]. "Bequest" is trademark protected by FF Bequest Limited (UK00003452648). FF Bequest Limited is registered in England and Wales, No 12367897.

0203 916 5433

FF Bequest Limited, trading as Bequest, is authorised and regulated by the Financial Conduct Authority with firm reference number 923791. You can check our authorisation on the FCA Financial Services Register by visiting the following website: register.fca.org.uk . We are registered in England and Wales, Registered office address: Founders Factory, Northcliffe House, London, United Kingdom, W8 5EH. Company Number 12367897.

Regulated by the Information Commissioner's Office (ICO) [ZA662891]. "Bequest" is trademark protected by FF Bequest Limited (UK00003452648). FF Bequest Limited is registered in England and Wales, No 12367897.

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