Who Is Responsible For Funeral Payments?

Funeral payments can be quite large sometimes and it's normally the responsibility of the loved ones to pay for them. Read more to learn what else can help.

When the death of a loved one happens, it’s normally the responsibility of the closest loved ones when it comes to funeral payments. With the average cost of a traditional burial being £4,383 and a cremation being £3,290 in the UK, it’s best to be prepared (life insurance can help with that!) so that when the time comes you aren’t burdened with money worries as well as grief.

Some things to note

A funeral is a chance to say your final goodbyes after the loss of a loved one; try and remember that it’s unlikely that the person who’s died would want you to get into financial problems when arranging their funeral. Sometimes small actions such as kind words and sentimental music will mean more than other expensive funeral costs. There are many ways to prepare a simple funeral.

It isn’t always necessary to use a funeral director and there is no legal requirement, they are normally the most expensive part of arranging a funeral. Whilst it may be more difficult, you can ask for help from your family and friends. When taking things into your own hands, it’s important you know the essential steps to take.

However, using a funeral director does make the process a lot less emotionally challenging. If you do decide on using one, it’s worth shopping around to compare prices.

So, who is responsible for paying?

The people who are named on the will as the executors are those who are responsible for paying for and arranging the funeral. The funeral expenses can be gathered from the person who’s passed estate, whether it’s from gifts of money or the selling of assets left behind. If there isn’t enough money left to cover the costs of the funeral, it is usually down to the person’s loved ones to meet these expenses.

This is just one of the many reasons why we suggest life insurance, as it can cover the cost of their funeral with the payout. However, there are some cases of workplace or personal pension schemes that contribute some payment towards the expenses of the funeral. But if the funeral is already planned and paid for, there’s nothing to worry about when it comes to the admin side of things. Love it when people are prepared! 👏

It’s important to discuss and establish where the money will come from when the time comes, particularly if the person’s estate won’t cover the cost.

What if they didn’t make a will?

If the person who has passed away did not make a will, the person who would legally be entitled to the estate (usually the relative who is closest) would have the responsibility to arrange and sometimes pay for the funeral expenses. However, if the next of kin is not able to afford or arrange the funeral as there aren’t sufficient funds left over from the estate, they will be required to apply for funding. This is where Funeral Expenses Payments come in. Keep reading to learn more. 👇

What if the person who has died was an estranged family member?

While this could be an uncomfortable situation, it’s common for family members to become distant and even lose touch. When an estranged family member dies, relatives may be required to pay for the burial or cremation. There is no need to hold a ceremony if it isn’t desired, and relatives aren’t liable for the payment of the funeral.

If there is no family or friends who are willing to arrange and pay for the funeral and there simply isn’t enough estate to cover the costs, the council may pay for a simple cremation ceremony. In the event of this, there will be no funeral service held.

What if I can’t afford it?

A Funeral Expenses Payment (it could also be described as funeral benefits) is a government-funded initiative that was created to help cover the funeral costs of those who are already in receipt of certain benefits and tax credits. The receivable amount is dependent on your personal circumstances.

The Funeral Expenses Payments can be used to cover costs such as burial or cremation fees, death certificates, moving the body more than 50 miles within the UK and you can even claim between £700-£1000 to pay for the funeral director’s fees.

If there’s one thing you should take from this, it’s the importance of wills and life insurance. By making a will and purchasing life insurance with Bequest, you and your loved ones can be left with peace of mind. There’s no wondering what your loved ones wishes were or who’s going to pay for a funeral. We’ve streamlined the process so that you can focus on making the most of your time left. 💛

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FF Bequest Limited, trading as Bequest, is authorised and regulated by the Financial Conduct Authority with firm reference number 923791. You can check our authorisation on the FCA Financial Services Register by visiting the following website: register.fca.org.uk . We are registered in England and Wales, Registered office address: Founders Factory, Northcliffe House, London, United Kingdom, W8 5EH. Company Number 12367897.

Regulated by the Information Commissioner's Office (ICO) [ZA662891]. “Bequest" is trademark protected by FF Bequest Limited (UK00003452648). FF Bequest Limited is registered in England and Wales, No 12367897.

0203 916 5433

FF Bequest Limited, trading as Bequest, is authorised and regulated by the Financial Conduct Authority with firm reference number 923791. You can check our authorisation on the FCA Financial Services Register by visiting the following website: register.fca.org.uk . We are registered in England and Wales, Registered office address: Founders Factory, Northcliffe House, London, United Kingdom, W8 5EH. Company Number 12367897.

Regulated by the Information Commissioner's Office (ICO) [ZA662891]. “Bequest" is trademark protected by FF Bequest Limited (UK00003452648). FF Bequest Limited is registered in England and Wales, No 12367897.

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